Professur für Marketing

Integrating Sensory Evaluation in Adaptive Conjoint Analysis to Elaborate the Conflicting Influence of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Attributes on Food Choice

Sensory properties and packaging information are factors which considerably contribute to food choice. We present a new methodology in which sensory preference testing was integrated in adaptive conjoint analysis. By simultaneous variation of intrinsic and extrinsic attributes on identical levels, this procedure allows assessing the importance of attribute/level combinations on product selection. In a set-up with nine pair-wise comparisons and four subsequent calibration assessments, 101 young consumers evaluated vanilla yoghurt which was varied in fat content (four levels), sugar content (two levels) and flavour intensity (two levels); the same attribute/level combinations were also presented as extrinsic information. The results indicate that the evaluation of a particular attribute may largely diverge in intrinsic and in extrinsic processing. We noticed from our utility values that, for example, the acceptance of yoghurt increases with an increasing level of the actual fat content, whereas acceptance diminishes when a high fat content is labelled on the product. This article further implicates that neglecting these diverging relationships may lead to an over- or underestimation of the importance of an attribute for food choice.

Hoppert, K.; Mai, R.; Zahn, S.; Hoffmann, S.; Rohm, H. (2012). Integrating Sensory Evaluation in Adaptive Conjoint Analysis to Elaborate the Conflicting Influence of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Attributes on Food Choice, Appetite, 59 (3), 949-965.